Wound Management Forecast 2016 to 2026

The global annual market for products used in wound management is currently a behemoth of $20.2 billion. The wound management forecast to 2026 shows the global market hitting $38 billion as it grows in response to strong wound care demand.

The market is driven by inescapable demographics — an aging population, with dramatically increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes leading to growth in the most expensive types of wounds, chronic wounds. The market is also growing as a result of advanced wound technologies that improving in their ability to shorten healing time, costs, or both.

Chronic wound remain a big focus, for good reasons. From our press release:

“Our recent research shows that chronic wounds, which have long been no secret to clinicians, epidemiologists, and product manufacturers as a growing health problem, are actually even more prevalent and costly than has been previously reported.”

Care of chronic wounds is a significant, global burden on healthcare systems. In the USA alone, it is estimated that at least 6.7 million people suffer with chronic wounds, requiring treatment in excess of $20-50 billion per year .

With many, many active companies in an industry that started hundreds of years ago, an almost continuous spectrum of products exists from low tech (gauze) to high tech (bioengineered skin):

      • traditional adhesive
      • traditional gauze
      • non-adherent
      • film
      • foam
      • hydrogel
      • hydrocolloid
      • alginate
      • antimicrobial
      • collagen
      • negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT)
      • bioengineered skin & skin substitution
      • growth factors

Growth in sales varies, with the lowest rates for traditional products and the highest rates generally for the advanced products. We say generally because, depending upon the product and the geographic location, sales growth rates can be considerable. The end result is that the makeup of the wound market will change from 2016 to 2026. See below:

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report S254.

Put another way, some segments will gain share of the total wound market at the expense of others:

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S254.

 

And considering geography, the wound care industry recognizes the major impact of China on future demand, eventually eclipsing U.S. sales:

USA vs. Asia/Pacific Wound Sales

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report S254.

Companies

The wound care industry remains quite fragmented, with about eight companies holding leading market shares, but with possibly thousands of small cap companies around the world that are also manufacturing and marketing various wound care products. The Traditional Wound Care space remains attractive, in part since gauze dressings are relatively easy to manufacture and are also still the most commonly-used wound dressing.

2017 Worldwide Wound Management Market Shares

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report S254.


The MedMarket Diligence Report #S254 is described in detail at link.

Separate size, growth and competitor data are presented for the U.S., rest of North America, Latin America, leading western European countries (specifically, United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy, Spain), rest of Europe, Japan, Korea, rest of Asia/Pacific, and the Rest of World category. The report’s company profiles assess 92 leading and key emerging companies regarding current/projected products, technologies and positions in the advanced wound care market.

 

 

Country and Regional Variability in Growth of Wound Management Sales

The growth/volume distribution of wound care technologies.

As illustrated in a previous post, wound management products are a spectrum from the simple to the complex:

Source: MedMarket Diligence Report #S254.

Generally, the longer the product has been around (e.g., gauze), the less complex it is compared to emerging technologies…

…BUT simpler is easy to adopt and, with well established sales, growth on a percentage basis will be low (see area in red)..’

Generally, new technologies incorporate rarer materials, have more complex construction, and may cost considerably more…

…BUT complex technologies may be far more effective clinically than older technologies and may allow treatment where no older technology could, and with low initial sales (penetrated potential), growth on a percentage bases will be high (see area in green).

Country and Regional Variation in Growth Rates

While this size-to-growth dynamic exists for most product types, the dynamic varies from one geographic region to the next. The time point at which a particular product/technology starts to be more rapidly adopted — or the rate at which use of  established products are use starts to decline — can vary considerably from country to country.

As a result, there will be variability in sales growth rates for a product in one country/region versus another.

For example, the 2017 to 2026 compound annual growth rate in sales of Alginates in wound management range from a low of 5.3% in one country to a high of 24.3% in another country. (If you make alginates, in which country would YOU like to compete?)

Regionally, as in USA versus Europe versus Asia/Pacific, etc., there is less variation in growth rates for any given product in that region. For alginates:

  • country-to-country variation in CAGR: 19%
  • region-to-region variation in CAGR: 7.8%

In other words, the difference between the countries with the highest and lowest CAGRs for alginate sales is 19%, while the difference between regions shows one region with a 7.8% higher CAGR for alginates than the lowest growth region.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S254.

Before chasing after that high growth rate, it is important to know the underlying volume. (Sales of $1 in year 1 and $2 in year 2 is a 100% growth rate, but it’s absolute growth of only $1.)


See the full REPORT, “Wound Management to 2026” details or order online. Please also see the forecast and market share data available separately from the report.

 

USA slipping behind Asia/Pacific markets in wound care sales

We present data from our 2016 to 2026 forecast of the global market for wound management products. (Data available, full report this month.)

At a glimpse, you can see the overall trend in global wound management, including the relative size of each market. (The four regional sales charts are shown on the same scale to illustrate this.)  Most notably, the USA dominance of this global market is fading, as aggregate Asia/Pacific sales of all wound products will eclipse USA sales within the forecast period.

Wound Management Worldwide, 2016-2026, By Region

 

 

 

 

 


Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S254.

Looking at just the aggregate of all wound product types, Asia/Pacific relative sales are squeezing out shares in every other region.Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S254.

When we then look specifically at the USA versus Asia/Pacific, it illustrates that by 2020, Asia/Pacific’s sales of wound management products will eclipse those of the U.S., making it the largest regional wound management market.

Source: MedMarket Diligence, LLC; Report #S254.

MedMarket Future: Graphene, Advanced Materials, Organ-on-a-chip

Proliferation of graphene applications

The nature of graphene’s structure and its resulting traits are responsible for a tremendous burst of research focused on applications.

  • Find cancer cells. Research at the University of Illinois at Chicago showed that interfacing brain cells on the surface of a graphene sheet allows the ability to differentiate a single hyperactive cancerous cell from a normal cell. This represents a noninvasive technique for the early detection of cancer.
  • Graphene sheets capture cells efficiently. In research similar to that U. Illinois, modification of the graphene sheet by mild heating enables annealing of specific targets/analytes on the sheet which then can be tested. This, too, offers noninvasive diagnostics.
  • Contact lens coated with graphene. While the value of the development is yet to be seen, researchers in Korea have learned that contact lenses coated with graphene are able to shield wearers’ eyes from electromagnetic radiation and dehydration.
  • Cheaply mass-producing graphene using soybeans. A real hurdle to graphene’s widespread use in a variety of applications is the cost to mass produce it, but Australia’s CSIRO has shown that an ambient air process to produce graphene from soybean oil, which is likely to accelerate graphenes’ development for commercial use.

Materials

Advanced materials development teams globally are spinning out new materials that have highly specialized features, with the ability to be manufactured under tight control.

  • 3D manufacturing leads to highly complex, bio-like materials. With applications across many industries using “any material that can be crushed into nanoparticles”, University of Washington research has demonstrated the ability to 3D engineer complex structures, including for use as biological scaffolds.
  • Hydrogels and woven fiber fabric. Hokkaido University researchers have produced woven polyampholyte (PA) gels reinforced with glass fiber. Materials made this way have the structural and dynamic features to make them amenable for use in artificial ligaments and tendons.
  • Sound-shaping metamaterial. Research teams at the Universities of Sussex and Bristol have developed acoustic metamaterials capable of creating shaped sound waves, a development that will have a potentially big impact on medical imaging.

Organ-on-a-chip

In vitro testing models that more accurately reflect biological systems for drug testing and development will facilitate clinical diagnostics and clinical research.

  • Stem cells derived neuronal networks grown on a chip. Scientists at the University of Bern have developed an in vitro stem cell-based bioassay grown on multi-electrode arrays capable of detecting the biological activity of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins.
  • Used for mimicking heart’s biomechanical properties. At Vanderbilt University, scientists have developed an organ-on-a-chip configuration that mimics the heart’s biomechanical properties. This will enable drug testing to gauge impact on heart function.
  • Used for offering insights on premature aging, vascular disease. Brigham and Women’s Hospital has developed organ-on-a-chip model designed to study progeria (Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome), which primarily affects vascular cells, making this an affective method for the first time to simultaneously study vascular diseases and aging.